Funny bone

“…her nose was stubby and aggressive and her mouth had the coldly forbidding look of the closed door of a subway express when you have just missed the train…”

That’s one of the many witty & hilarious descriptions that made me want to laugh out loud while reading P.G.Wodehouse‘s ‘Piccadilly Jim‘ on the subway. The only thing stopping me was the thought that people might think I am quite daft. I wonder how I managed to not have read this awesome writer all these years. I remember a friend of mine recommending his books way back in school, but somehow I remained ignorant to his funny world. Thankfully I have discovered his unique way of making every other sentence in his book sound super funny. And never a repetitive note. Looks like I have a lot to catch up on. ‘Piccadilly Jim’ is one of the most entertaining comedy of errors that I have come across. What do you think of Wodehouse’s works?

Btw, remember my 2014 Goodreads Reading Challenge? I am nearing the 1/3rd mark for my 2015 reading challenge. Feels good!

The Book Thief

People observe the colors of a day only at its beginnings and ends, but to me it’s quite clear that a day merges through a multitude of shades and intonations with each passing moment. A single hour can consist of thousands of different colors. Waxy yellows, cloud-spot blues. Murky darkness. In my line of work, I make it a point to notice them.

Markus Zusak’s The Book Thief is a poignant tale of childhood in Nazi Germany. Narrated by Death, a very very unusual voice, the story follows Liesel Meminger from being given up for foster care, to starting to love her new family, making new friends, saving a life, and ultimately losing it all during the bombing of Munich during World War II. And it all weaves through the little girl’s curiosity and hunger for books and words. I admit, reading the book made me a little teary-eyed at times. And yet, it is not a constant reminder of the pain of those days, on the contrary it speaks about how there is happiness to be found in the toughest times and from the most meager means. The book is a heartening story of love, friendship, trust and hope. A book I am sure I will remember for a long time.

On a side-note, have you played that listing-favorite-books-and-tagging-friends game that was all the rage a few weeks ago on Facebook?

And the Mountains Echoed

He was the one raising her. It was true. even though he was still a child himself. Ten years old.”

I have previously read Khaled Hosseini‘s The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns. Both these books made me admire the author’s workI had been looking for And the Mountains Echoed for quite some time and luckily a friend lent it to me. The story revolves around a brother-sister duo who are inseparable and completely devoted to each other as the only real family. It follows their story through time and draws out a beautiful story of love, separation and longing. As always, there are several intertwined sub-plots weaving through Hosseini’s text, and it is interesting to see how they are ultimately tied together. A good read, all in all, especially if you have read his previous books. Always nice to complete a set, right?!

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd

“Key is in the lock all right, sir. On the inside. Mr. Ackroyd must have locked himself in.”

Just finished reading The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by my all-time favorite Agatha Christie. As you must know, her books are next only to the Bible & Shakespeare‘s works as the most widely read publication ever. Over the years I have read several of her novels, but this latest read has made a bigger fan out of me, if that were even possible. I quite love the old English charm that is evident in the setting and the language of the time. This book has all the Agatha Christie staples – the secretive characters, the multiple motives, the sure-shot alibis. But of course, Hercule Poirot is at his best even at the hay end of his career as he breaks the case down bit by bit. The plot turns in the most unexpected way towards the end and makes one want to re-read the book all over again, in the newly revealed light. A highly recommended book.