Temporary

FotoJetFotoJet1FotoJet2Icebergs float freely on Jökulsárlón, a stunning glacial lake in southern Iceland. These floes have broken away from Breiðamerkurjökull, a glacier that is part of Vatnajökull, the largest glacier in Iceland and drift around the lagoon at their own pace. Temporary in nature, they slowly melt away. Some giant chunks of ice will stick around for months, shape-shifting as the sun, wind and water wear them away. Others, minute in comparison, will thaw within a day.

There’s more from the Weekly Photo Challenge on this blog!

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Spiral staircase, Vatican City

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Spirals are one of the most fascinating occurrences in nature and have inspired artists and architects through time immemorial. Built in 1932, this is the new Bramante Staircase in the Vatican Museum, a beautiful double helix staircase inspired by the original staircase built by Donato Bramante in 1505. Donato’s other striking contribution to the field of architecture is the design of the grand St.Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City.

In response to this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge prompt : Rounded

Check out more of my previous entries!

 

Photo Challenge : Window

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Mehrangarh Fort is one of the largest forts in India. It looms over the city of Jodhpur, in the state of Rajasthan. Jodhpur is a beautiful city with royal forts, beautiful lakes and gardens, bustling bazaars and a hearty appetite for delicious food. This city is also famously called the Blue City on account of a majority of houses in the older part of town being whitewashed in a blueish hue. The best ways to see proof of this are to either amble along the streets at ground level or hike up to the Mehrangarh Fort and enjoy a bird’s eye view from the ramparts. By the way, Jodhpur is Mr.A’s birthplace & childhood home, enough reason to be all the more special for me 🙂

This post, however, zooms in on a distinct attribute of many forts and palaces in India , a special kind of window that you see in the pictures, called the jharokha. It is a typical feature of Indo-Islamic architecture which is at once an enclosed balcony as well as a window. It served various purposes – beautifying the building facade with its intricate designs, pillars, and mini-roofs; providing a screen against the outer world through covered lattices; providing ventilation as well as shade against sun and rain.

P.S. I posted another picture clicked at the Fort in a previous entry to the Weekly Photo Challenge, when we talked about an ephemeral moment caught on camera.

Check out more from the Weekly Photo Challenge at Sunny District!