Bridge

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Årstabron or the Årsta Bridge has kept me company nearly every weekday the last couple of years. I’m extremely lucky because this gorgeous view greets me everyday at work 🙂 The bridge  spans part of Lake Mälaren in southern Stockholm. Over the course of the year, the lake changes with the seasons – sometimes a brilliant blue in the summer sun, at times a ghostly white in the snow, freezing over to solid rock in the winter, looking like a cracked mirror as spring starts to warm it up, and on special occasions offering a simple backdrop for a resplendent rainbow. The bridge stands by loyally in every season, always part of the landscape, always part of my day at work.

In response to this week’s prompt at The Daily Post. There’s more from this category on Sunny District. Have a happy weekend!

Objects in the mirror…

Every road trip that Mr.A and I brings so many transient moments like this one captured in the side view mirror of our car, when we feel we own the road, the landscape, the world! And they make me wish if only I could hit a pause button and hold on to this feeling a little longer. But as they say, objects in the mirror are closer than they appear, so are those memories held closer in our minds than we know, and they come back to us at inadvertent occasions to surprise us and bring a smile on our lips…

In response to the weekly prompt “Transient” on The Daily Post.

There’s more of the weekly photo challenges on Sunny District, hope you enjoy them, too!

Weekly Photo Challenge : Repurpose

 

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Kerið, crater repurposed to lake

Iceland, being located where it is, on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, is fairly high in geological & seismic activity. As such, there are several craters left over by numerous volcanic eruptions all over the island. Nature has decided to repurpose some of these into water basins called crater lakes, that is a lake formed when water collects in a volcanic crater or caldera.

On our road-trip around Iceland last autumn, we got to see several such crater lakes, one of them being Kerið (pronounced Kerid or Kerith). The small and serene lake calmly sits between slopes that now run partly green in the warmer months. One can stroll around the rim to take a look at it from every angle, and also walk down to the edge of the water. The caldera itself is relatively young, only about 3000 years old. Researchers have discovered that there was possibly no eruption in this case – the cone volcano ran down its magma and the crater collapsed inwards. The water is from the water table, as opposed to precipitation like rain or melting ice. A trip to Iceland is definitely a revision course in geography & geology, something I enjoyed thoroughly back in school. So don’t be surprised if I start breaking into a ramble here 😉 What can I see, it’s as much a treat for the mind as it is for the eyes!

How to get there : Drive yourself or get together with a tour group. Kerið falls along the Golden Circle, a popular tourist route that starts at Reykjavik.

How far is it : From Reykjavik, it is about 62km, which should take you 40mins to an hour.

How much does it cost: With an entrance fee of 400ISK (as of November 2016), which comes to about €3, this is one of the cheaper attractions in Iceland.

If you are planning a trip to Iceland and have any questions regarding planning, just give me a shout-out & I’ll be more than happy to share my tips and stories 🙂

Click away for more stories from the Weekly Photo Challenge!